The Social Covenant

We are a member of Wisconsin Faith Voices for Justice and will be working with them on various projects. Visit their website for more about them and learn how to participate: www.wisconsinfaithvoicesforjustice.org

Mission of Wisconsin Faith Voices for Justice

Wisconsin Faith Voices for Justice unites progressive people of faith toward creating a state whose people and government address the real needs and raise the dignity of the hungry and poor; care for and heal the sick; and truly listen to the voices of all citizens. Drawing from the wisdom of our faith traditions, we accomplish this through educating our members and the broader community, and advocating with our legislators to advance the common good.which unites progressive people of faith toward creating a state whose people and government address the real needs and raise the dignity of the hungry and poor; care for and heal the sick; and truly listen to the voices of all citizens.


 

Here is the first policy statement put out by WVFJ (formerly Concerned Religious Leaders of Wisconsin):

A Religious Witness to the breach in the Social Covenant for the Common Good between the People and the State of Wisconsin January through June 2011

posted Wednesday, August 3, 2011

A truly democratic government acts in accordance with the wishes of the governed. It has, in the past, been the desire of the people of Wisconsin – through the social service, educational, and health care programs of its government – to assist its citizens to maintain lives of dignity and honor. And many Wisconsinites pursue this goal because of the religious values to which they subscribe.

The biblical book of Genesis teaches us that humanity was created in the divine image. We understand this to mean that each person on the planet possesses some aspect of the divine, and therefore we must treat each person with kindness, justice, and respect. Many religious traditions share the concept of the Golden Rule, that is, that we must act toward others, as we would want them to act toward us.[1] This ethical directive, existing between and among all inhabitants of our world, forms a ‘social covenant,’ that holds not only between individuals, but also between the citizenry and our government.

It is this social covenant that we seek to uphold each day in our work as religious leaders. Yet we have seen many elements of this covenant shredded in the recently passed biennium budget. As religious leaders of Wisconsin who are heirs to the prophetic tradition of social justice, we call upon our Legislature to search deep in their souls to find a more moral path to fiscal responsibility.